In My Head and Not Yours: Next-In- Line Effect for Therapists

dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Drew A.
dc.contributor.authorDickens, Chelsea
dc.contributor.authorBlauser, Kelsey
dc.contributor.authorRobles, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorGoodman, Jeffrey
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-24T13:30:15Z
dc.date.available2017-04-24T13:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.description.abstractWhen therapists are thinking about what interventions they want to implement, searching for the perfect question, or just wanting to say what they have in mind, then they are subject to missing what the client is saying. The next-in- line effect (Brenner, 1973; Bond, 1985) has shown that when people are next in line they may miss cues or fail to encode. Using the next in line effect as a teaching demonstration to reveal the effects of the phenomenon have been implemented (Desforges, 2007). The purpose of the current teaching demonstration is to highlight the application of the effect for student therapists.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2346.1/30625
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectNext-In-Lineen_US
dc.subjectTeaching Activitiesen_US
dc.titleIn My Head and Not Yours: Next-In- Line Effect for Therapistsen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US

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